Gold Light: the world’s first quantum jewellery

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December 13, 2012

ICN’s Inorganic Nanoparticles Group and the CNBSS, together with partners from the art world, present Gold Light: the world’s first gold-nanoparticle jewellery.

The creative venture, which marries Barcelona’s artisanal traditional with the Inorganic Nanoparticles Group’s scientific know-how, has served as a case study in safety-by-design for the CNBSS.

To learn more about Gold Light jewellery, click here.
To learn more about the CNBSS, click here.
The distinctive colours of Gold Light jewellery derive from different types of gold nanoparticles.

The distinctive colours of Gold Light jewellery derive from different types of gold nanoparticles.

The Centre for NanoBioSafety and Sustainability (CNBSS) organised the premiere of Gold Light, the first quantum jewellery product, last night at the Hotel Mercer, in Barcelona. Gold Light is the fruit of a collaboration that combines Barcelona’s long artisanal tradition with Nanotechnology developed by ICN’s Inorganic Nanoparticles Group. Gold Light is an extraordinary jewellery product, unique for both its innovation and its aesthetics.
A multidisciplinary team, including jewellery designer Roberto Carrascosa, artist Joan Peris, production designer Francesc Oliveras, and art business manager Jose Luis Fettolini, developed Gold Light over the course of a year, based on specialist knowledge from the Inorganic Nanoparticles Group. The final product exploits the aesthetic potential of noble-metal nanoparticles and their special interaction with light. Jewellers traditionally work with precious metals, which in their smallest form exist as nanoparticles(at smaller sizes, metal particles lose their metallic properties). Gold Light, composed of gold nanoparticles, represents the advent of quantum jewellery, where quantum is used in the literal sense. Their work on Gold Light has also served as a case model for the CNBSS to evaluate the regulatory mechanisms and corporate obligations for the development and marketing of a product that contains nanoparticles. For the CNBSS, the venture served as a study in the safety-by-design of a nanoproduct, through advice from attorney Ignasi Gispert.
The ICN and Leitat Technological Center have contributed, via the CNBSS, to promoting the safe use of Nanotechnology-based solutions in strategic sectors, through educational and outreach programmes, industrial collaborations and services, and by supporting the launching of spin-offs. Although much of CNBSS’s applied research is focused on areas like Medicine, Cosmetics, Industrial Processes and the implications of Nanotechnology for worker and consumer safety, its work has the potential to impact a far broader array of sectors. In this context, the ICN’s Inorganic Nanoparticles Group and the CNBSS were able to collaborate in the field of Artistic Design, for which Barcelona’s role as a world capital of design and innovation is especially important.
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